***News Stories Thread*** ONGOING 2018

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juliej
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Joined: Thu Aug 05, 2010 12:59 pm

Re: ***News Stories Thread*** ONGOING 2018

Postby juliej » Thu Aug 30, 2018 7:47 pm

Very interesting article in Forbes: "Liquid Biopsy 'Weather Forecast' Can Predict When Tumors Will Return." It involves taking blood samples every 2-4 weeks and looking for mutational changes and then readjusting treatment based on the findings. I have a feeling liquid biopsies will be important in the near future!

In up to 75 percent of people who initially responded to cetuximab, the liquid biopsies picked up changes in the RAS gene before a standard imaging scan showed that cancer had returned, with computer modeling able to predict the estimated waiting time until the tumor would stop responding to the drug.


https://www.forbes.com/sites/victoriaforster/2018/08/30/liquid-biopsy-weather-forecast-can-predict-when-tumors-will-return/#3d7c78fc4d65

Juliej
Stage IV, liver/lung mets 8/4/2010
Xelox+Avastin 8/18/10 to 10/21/11
LAR, liver resec, HAI pump 11/11
Double lung surgery + ileo reversal 2/12
Adjuvant Xeloda 3-9/12
VATS rt. lung 12/21/12 - benign granuloma!
NED 3/17/12 to 9/14/2018, CEA<1

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Maggie Nell
Posts: 861
Joined: Wed May 27, 2015 1:57 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: ***News Stories Thread*** ONGOING 2018

Postby Maggie Nell » Thu Sep 06, 2018 2:36 am

DX April 2015, @ 54
35mm poorly diff. tumour, incidental finding following emergency r. hemicolectomy
for ileo-colic intussusception.
Lymph nodes: 0/22
T3 N0 MX

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Maggie Nell
Posts: 861
Joined: Wed May 27, 2015 1:57 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Colonoscopies: Why are they performed and when should you have them?

Postby Maggie Nell » Thu Sep 06, 2018 9:54 pm

Often there's a misconception that more tests and more health care leads to better health, when data suggest the opposite is true.
The global Choosing Wisely campaign aims to educate consumers about risks of over-testing.
In the future, symptoms-based algorithms and new diagnostic tests might improve a doctor's ability to identify those at increased risk of bowel cancer for colonoscopy.
In the meantime, prioritising colonoscopy for patients who are at higher risk should be the goal.


http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-07/c ... t/10212408
DX April 2015, @ 54
35mm poorly diff. tumour, incidental finding following emergency r. hemicolectomy
for ileo-colic intussusception.
Lymph nodes: 0/22
T3 N0 MX


Beckster
Posts: 289
Joined: Thu Jan 12, 2017 3:01 pm
Location: New Jersey

Re: ***News Stories Thread*** ONGOING 2018

Postby Beckster » Wed Sep 12, 2018 6:49 pm

Predicting Tumor Progression in CRC Patients ....

http://www.cancernetwork.com/colorectal ... memberme=1
57/Female
DX:(CC) 10/19/16
11/4/16- Lap right hemi(cecum)
CEA- Pre Op (1.9), Pre Chemo (2.5)
Type: Adenocarcinoma
Tumor size: 3.5 cm x 2.5 x 0.7 cm
Grade: G3 (surgical) G2 (pre-op)
TNM: T3N0M0/IIA
LN: 0/24
LVI present
Surgical margins: clear
MSS
12/27/2016 - Capeox, anaphylactic reaction to oxaliplatin on first infusion-discontinued
1/2/17 to 6/9/17- Xeloda monotherapy
6/26/17, 12/12/17, 6/18/18 CT Scan NED :D
CEA- 6/17- 3.6, 9/17- 2.8 12/17-2.8, 3/18-3.1, 6/18-3.0, 9/18 2.8, 12/18 2.5
Clear Colonoscopy 10/17 :D

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Maggie Nell
Posts: 861
Joined: Wed May 27, 2015 1:57 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Making my illness public property

Postby Maggie Nell » Sat Sep 15, 2018 8:50 pm

It's hard to describe just how stressful losing your hair is. It's the public manifestation of what is going on inside
and it means you're no longer in control of the message.


http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-16/b ... e/10242090
DX April 2015, @ 54
35mm poorly diff. tumour, incidental finding following emergency r. hemicolectomy
for ileo-colic intussusception.
Lymph nodes: 0/22
T3 N0 MX

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O Stoma Mia
Posts: 1450
Joined: Sat Jun 22, 2013 6:29 am

Re: How Is Rectal Cancer Care Being Improved by New National Standards?

Postby O Stoma Mia » Sun Sep 30, 2018 10:23 pm

How Is Rectal Cancer Care Being Improved by New National Standards?
https://my.clevelandclinic.org/podcasts/butts-and-guts/how-is-rectal-cancer-care-being-improved-by-new-national-standards
...And in many countries in Europe, all of the Scandinavian countries, plus the UK, Belgium, Germany, Ireland, elsewhere, it was proven that by having centers in which rectal cancer care was focused with expertise and a multi-disciplinary team approach, outcomes improved...l

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O Stoma Mia
Posts: 1450
Joined: Sat Jun 22, 2013 6:29 am

Immunotherapy could be the "fourth pillar" of cancer treatments

Postby O Stoma Mia » Tue Oct 02, 2018 1:24 am

Immunotherapy could be the "fourth pillar" of cancer treatments
https://www.axios.com/nobel-prize-winner-allison-cancer-immunotherapy-53f8dbd2-6a43-4928-90e3-0256be6e66f6.html
“By stimulating the ability of our immune system to attack tumor cells, this year’s Nobel Prize laureates have established an entirely new principle for cancer therapy.”

Jannine
Posts: 90
Joined: Wed Jun 20, 2018 7:46 am

Re: ***News Stories Thread*** ONGOING 2018

Postby Jannine » Fri Nov 02, 2018 1:52 pm

Probiotics and gastrointestinal conditions: An overview of evidence from the Cochrane Collaboration
from Nutrition, Volume 45, January 2018, Pages 125-134.e11
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... 1?via=ihub
(note, full article may not be free to download)

Abstract
Alterations in the composition of the gut microbiota are associated with a number of gastrointestinal (GI) conditions, including diarrhea, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), and liver diseases. Probiotics, live microorganisms that may confer a health benefit to the host when consumed, are commonly used as a therapy for treating these GI conditions by means of modifying the composition or activity of the microbiota. The purpose of this review was to summarize the evidence on probiotics and GI conditions available from Cochrane, a nonprofit organization that produces rigorous and high-quality systematic reviews of health interventions. Findings from this review will help provide more precise guidance for clinical use of probiotics and to identify gaps in probiotic research related to GI conditions.


Apologies if this was already linked, but I didn't see it mentioned elsewhere in this thread.
DX: sigmoid colon cancer 5/2018. 48 F
laparoscopic sigmoid resection (24 cm removed); no stoma.
7.5cm adenocarcinoma -- mod. diff.
1 noncontiguous tumor deposit removed; 0/31 lymph nodes
T3 pN1c M0
5/18 before surgery, CEA 11.2
6/18 began FOLFOX
7/18: CEA 1.9; added neulasta post infusion
9/18: CEA 2.8
10/18: 25% chemo reduction
11/18: CEA 1.8

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Maggie Nell
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Joined: Wed May 27, 2015 1:57 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia

The feeling that end-of-life caregivers won't admit to...

Postby Maggie Nell » Sat Nov 03, 2018 6:41 am

"One of the hardest things for a family care-giver is deciding when the benefits of medication
are worth the burden on the patient. It's a fine line to walk," she says.


https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-45884012
DX April 2015, @ 54
35mm poorly diff. tumour, incidental finding following emergency r. hemicolectomy
for ileo-colic intussusception.
Lymph nodes: 0/22
T3 N0 MX

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Maggie Nell
Posts: 861
Joined: Wed May 27, 2015 1:57 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia

If You're Single With Cancer......

Postby Maggie Nell » Sat Dec 01, 2018 7:24 pm

If you are divorced, widowed or never married and develop cancer, watch out. You may get less aggressive treatment than your married friends.

We’ve often heard about studies showing that married adults are more likely to survive cancer than singles. But buried in those same studies is another finding that hasn’t made the headlines. When surgery or radiotherapy is the treatment of choice, patients with spouses are more likely to get it.

I had no idea that marital status might affect medical care until an oncologist, talking about what treatment to give me, asked if I have a spouse or children. When I said no to both, he looked genuinely concerned. “But how will you manage?” he asked. He then proposed to give me only one mild drug, although the standard of care was a much harsher — and more effective — combination chemotherapy. When I tried to describe my strong network of friends and extended family, he talked right over me.

If I hadn’t moved on to another oncologist who gave me the recommended treatment, I probably wouldn’t have survived.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/national ... story.html


OMG! I don't know what scares me more....that there won't be a cure for cancer or that there is a secret breeding program for these clowns...
DX April 2015, @ 54
35mm poorly diff. tumour, incidental finding following emergency r. hemicolectomy
for ileo-colic intussusception.
Lymph nodes: 0/22
T3 N0 MX

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CRguy
Posts: 9675
Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2008 6:00 pm

Canadian student's discovery could prevent cancer -- and HIV

Postby CRguy » Sat Dec 01, 2018 7:41 pm

Caitlin Miron has found something huge: She was honoured for discovering a chemical compound with the ability to prevent cancer growth, but it could also have significant applications in halting the spread of HIV, too. In an exclusive interview with Yahoo Canada News, the Ontario PhD student revealed why her discovery could be more far-reaching — for everything from HIV to Zika — than originally reported.

Canadian student's discovery could prevent cancer -- and HIV

THIS is exactly why basic science research is SO important !
Caregiver x 3
Stage IV A rectal cancer/lung met
11 Year survivor
my life is an ongoing totally randomized UNcontrolled experiment with N=1 !
Review of my Journey so far


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